About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
will hear from you. we want to ask who you voted for and why and your reaction to the results. cnn a few minutes ago declared a hampshire for the president and its four key electoral votes. both with an eye on the electoral votes. this is the scene from the obama campaign headquarters in chicago. we are also in boston at romney headquarters. jill is on the phone, democrats, warren, pennsylvania. what was a light when he went to the polls today? caller: we vote in a very small town. i saw one of my former students. host: as the look of the results tonight, what do you think? caller: i see president obama all the way. as a teacher, this is fantastic. unions, we very strongly support president obama. host: jasmine from st. augustine, florida, republican line. caller: i voted early. this was my first year that i could actually vote. and i voted for romney. i voted for him because he is all about helping the middle- class and having small businesses. my fiancee and his father owned a small business. the democrats talk about how that are moving forward and i have not seen any forward progressi
, not just be entertained. >> it is not as exciting as cnn or fox. you get the real story and i like it. cspan, created by american's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now we joined president obama for his last event of the day. a rally in green bay, wisconsin. the president is back on the campaign trail after spending the first part of the week with people who suffered from hurricane city. this is 35 minutes. ♪ >> hello, boundulder. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. are you fired up? are you ready to go? you seem pretty fired up. it is good to back in colorado. everybody please get savannah a great round of applause for the introduction. but of the shout out to the folks who are fighting for you every day in washington, senator michael bennett, senator mark udall. it is good to be here. thank you. now, i love you back. i do. you know, those of you who have seats, feel free to sit down. i do know what you tired. you know, for the past few days, all this have been focused on one of the worst storms of our lifetime. we are humb
watching cnn. host: we are asking people as far as house and senate races, and who'd you plan to vote for? caller: the thing about it was, i would have voted for the person. we have a governor, we also have a woman mayor in tulsa. is a christian man. host: thank you crawl of you have -- who have participated. for coverage on what happens with the president and house and senate races, we invite you to go to c-span.org for more information. especially on election day. and find out more information. we have many come a majority of the key senate debates, house, too. online for you to view there at c-span.org. coming up, there is the same sex ballot initiative on four states this election day. we will speak with fred sainz of the human rights campaign. and we wanted to let you know is ours is a joint project is concerned between book tv and american history, it is a month hilliard, vt. weekend. -- montpelier, vermont. it has a population of about 8000 people. it is the smallest united states state capital. at 12:00 p.m. we are going to focus their book programming. we are touring northeastern
was very struck that cnn found its groove with john kean and the message board. if you were looking for any race, anywhere, you could find the information you were looking for. i was struck by margaret hoover , a political columnist who is so beautiful youth is so smart and every time she speaks, you think is she's smart. who are some of the people starting to blow you away or the institutions you thought played a major role? >> i would say going back to my original theory -- sasha eisenberg and his book, the victory lap, he nailed it. he was saying it before anyone else, that this was going to come down to turnout and techniques and so i give him a lot credit. might beraid this controversial, but i think nate silver, since this was the year of the polls, he nailed it. on the political side, having covered ted crews, i'm really impressed, and he's going to be a player. he could be a republican supreme court nominee if not a candidate for president or vice president. >> i don't think many people have heard that much about them. >> he becomes the third former supreme court clerk to be serving
women who have shaped the world and a top 10 cnn hero. we're very pleased to have her as a guest here at the chicago conference on big ideas. [applause] >> can i talk? >> yeah. as she describes her project, i want you to in some way to put yourself in her shoes. britain you got the call in the middle of the night, sometimes from a disconnected voice, and you are 21 years old. you just got the love of your life. expand the moment into the mission she is about to describe to you. the audience is yours. >> on may 21, 2007, my life ended. it started out like any other day. i woke up to the ding ding of instant messaging. i ran to my computer and got to see my husband, michael, on the screen. i met him when i was a socially awkward clarinet player in the high school band. it made no sense to me that this gorgeous trombone player would talk to me, let alone to ask me out. but he did. we eventually did it all through high school and college and parted ways to until i received a call from him knowing that he decided to join the army. total surprise to me. we wrote letters every day during his
remember, in a lot of our jobs, we have cnn or span = = or cspan but i did not have it on. by first reaction was i just ran my pantyhose and i have to brief a general. this is not a good sign. my second reaction was there is a lot of smoke coming out of that building. one of the privileges i had is parking. very few get parking at the pentagon. the reality is i ran to my car, got people out of that building up from the point on, our world and the united states and around the world has changed. cyber has taken a huge role and place in the world since. we entered into a global war on terror, started in afghanistan, went to iraq, back to afghanistan. there will still be peacekeeping troops and they are huge challenges about stability of government and stability's and our roles as that of those countries. we will continue to adjust would need to be done but none of that is done without our dependence and involvement in the cyberworld. technology drives everything we do the world wide web has made us more interconnected than at any time in our human history. the vast majority of our empe
. i just happened to catch the comments he made on cnn last night. he was very grateful to the tennis feeding vehicles he had seen just after his press conference. -- the 10 vehicles. we appreciate any out reached to let people know what we are working on in staten island. we are in tottenville, hugenot, and we are all over there. we're continuing to build on that. again, a quick summary. in new york, a massive feeding effort under way on long island with fixed feeding sites in nassau and sussex with more coming. s.i., queens, brooklyn, the bronx, manhattan, and the two on long island. 40 shelters, but i think you are most concerned with beating capacity. -- feeding capacity. we have already shipped 307,000 meals into new york. for new jersey, we also have 30 shelters open in the garden state and we have four mobile kitchens that are capable of 80,000 meals per day with another 350,000 ready-to-eat meals already there. both cases include kosher meals. there are disturbing food as well. we are stealing of the full resources of our feeding capabilities in all of the impacted states. >>
. perhaps you'd like to share with us your thoughts, your experience. did i see you on cnn one night as you were working with your constituents, trying to meet the disaster in your area. mr. pallone: i want to thank my colleague from california for having this special order and talking about the hurricane damage and what needs to be done in the future. i have to say that the damage to my district was catastrophic . we had many towns where initially at least it looked like the majority of the homes and businesses were wiped out. now, when we go back and look again, some of them can be saved. but we're talking about thousands of people who lost their homes and many of others who lost their businesses. it really created a humanitarian crisis in that first week or so because we were trying to get fema in with the disaster recovery centers and with the red cross and the salvation army. and really over the first week the main concern was just humanitarian, trying to find shelter for people, trying to make sure they had food and water and clothes. but i have to say the response was overwhelming. s
for newsweek and the daily beast as well as a cnn contributor. they were responsible for writing the eulogies of all firefighters and police officers who died during 9/11. the author of "independent nation." and "wingnut." also the editor of america's greatest newspaper columns. now, ladies and gentlemen, let's listen to a conversation on growing up in the white house. please join me in welcoming susan ford bales, lynda johnson robb, and john to the stage. [applause] >> by way of beginning, last night, we were sitting up late talking about today's talk. you are quoted in it. gosh, i don't have a copy of it. magically, there was a copy. i went to the page. it was called "touring dixie with lbj." written may 10, 1964. this was meant to be. here are the opening lines about lbj in which lynda is featured later in the column. touring the south with president johnson is like going back to the old evangelical chautauqua circuit. [laughter] this is clearly meant to be. as was indicated, we're going to have a casual conversation. history behind the scenes and personal life and the white house. obvious
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9